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Check Your Tyres – do not wait until 1.6 mm is left before changing your tyres ?

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check your tyres

Pistonheads. comhi ! newbie here on PH, my first post of many – so here goes – after reading the thread on ‘do you wait till 1.6mm before changing your tyres’ i decided to check my treads on my 2010 997.2 turbo cab, they are…

Eric Roberts‘s insight:

This is always good advice” check your tyres”

 

Of course, here in the UK and most of Europe. Hence, it is Bank Holiday season coming up ! Time to Check Your Caravan Tyres . So, the legal limit is 1.6 mm across 3/4 of the tread from the centre outwards, if you are above that then

So, the important thing to remember is ! Consequently, that most cars today have cars fitted with tyres.  That do not have any sipes, once you get down to 3 mm of remaining rubber on the tread area.

Of course, the sipes are the very small slits that you can see all over the tyres. These sipes help get rid of the water. Importantly, between the tread area and the road surface . Significantly, they are are one of the most important thing in tyres safety design ! So Check Your Tyres .

Without them you are running on “slick tyres“. Subsequently, the type of rubbers that you see on F1 racing cars that are “bald”. This gives the cars excellent grip in very dry weather. But render them useless in wet weather. So the moral of this story is to remove your tyres at 3 mm ! For safeties sake alone.

Sipes are the tiny splits that are purposely designed.

So to help dissipate the water. Hence, between the tyre and the road surface in wet or snowy weather. Of course, their are thousands of them in any typical tyre design. But they only operate down to the 3 mm limit on most modern tyres. Especially on the new type of SUV and High Performance Car Tyres.

There are many differing types of sipes used in the design when making tyres. Some designed to lock with each other when the tread block moves. This locking together of the sipes enables  the tread block to remain solid  (helping to improve the road holding capabilities of the tyre) whilst still helping the tyre retain its grip in wet conditions. Other types of sipe are known as  keyhole sipes. This type of sipe, is shaped so that the bottom of the sipe is wider than the top. As a result, similar to a keyhole design. This comes from the fact that as the tyre wears. So, and the depth of the grooves and sipes are reduced. Then the sipe width is increased. So, retaining the overall volume.

Tyre safety Check Your Tyres  information can be found at…www.tyresafe.org

See on www.pistonheads.com

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