Lithium batteries Good Future- are the big hope for electric cars. Lithium sounds f…

Lithium batteries Good Future

Lithium batteries Good Future

Lithium batteries Good Future

Consequently, Lithium batteries are the big hope for electric cars. Subsequently, Lithium sounds familiar. Not just from Mr Firths Chemistry class. Also. Aren’t Lithium the exploding things in laptops  and banned from flying on airlines.

Fires in these batteries are common place? In my opinion then fire incidents are being swept under the carpet. Hence, and are no longer reported. However only time will tell if these batteries are safe. So and can be recycled safely.

Lithium Ion batteries are very energy-efficient. But do not have a long life cycle. Subsequently, like the Nickel battery. Another “No” is that they And they are pretty expensive to replace. Also,if you have one faulty cell, then you have to replace the entire unit.
( Tesla have solved this particular problem, with replaceable blades in the Roadster batteries. So you can just replace the faulty blade. These electric car batteries only come with the $100K Tesla car. Attached and are not available separately! The Roadster has over 6000 lithium ion batteries. Hence, to power its high speed.). Other instruments including laptops do use lithium batteries. When used in electric cars. Then these problems have been largely eliminated. Thus, by placing the electric car batteries in a stronger casing unit.

Lithium batteries Good Future

As we all know. Governments have been throwing billions into battery development. mostly throwing money at the universities. it has been a success up to a point. However, I still think that the electric car will only be a small part of the total vehicle mix. In the future then the humble lead acid battery will still be going strong. At the moment there are an estimated 20’000 electric cars in the UK. Compared to a total number of 25.6 million vehicles on our roads in 2017.I also find it a funny thought, that 200 electric cars all turn up at once for batteries charging on a motorway service area.

Eric Roberts